Barbara Regina Dietzsch

1706 - 1783
followers
13
Barbara Regina Dietzsch (22 Sept. 1706 in Nuremberg- May 1, 1783); a painter and draftswoman from the Nuremberg Dietzsch artist dynasty.

Barbara Regina Dietzsch was one of the most gifted and productive members of the Dietzsch family. She was the oldest daughter of the painter, illustrator and etcher Johann Israel Dietzsch. Like her sister as well as her 5 younger brothers, she received her training in the father's workshop.

Her work was in demand internationally and was exported to the Netherlands and England. She has repeatedly received the reputation of being a court painter, but she regularly rejected this professional perspective. It is not known if that was for family reasons or because she did not want to subject her artistic freedom to the taste of the court.

Her pictures depict birds, insects, flowers, landscapes, hunting scenes and portraits that were very popular in the 18th century. Dietzsch worked very detailed. Thus the finest spiderwebs can be seen on "Spiney Thistle with Insects". Her meticulous drawing style is goes back to her study of Dutch and French still lifes. After her death, one reviewer ...
(Google translation of text at https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Regina_Dietzsch)



The distinguished Dietzsch family numbered 2 women painted among its members. An elder daughter of Johann Israel, Barbara Regina Dietzsch (1706-83), mastered the art of flower painting in gouache, mostly for engravers. Her work was exact and linear, as one might expect of designs for engraving, but in her more ambitious flower pieces she exhibited a conservatism of approach which was fairly antiquarian. For all its charm, it showed that flower painting had begun to prey upon its own history; except in the hands of great masters, the genre was in decline. Margaretha Barbara Dietzsch (1726-95) painted, like her elder sister, flower portraits for engravers.
(from The Obstacle Race: The Fortunes of Women Painters and Their Work by Germaine Greer; Google Books.)
upload photo

First Collected by

Olga Schwartau

collection
94

Contributors 1

Related Artists

+ add artist