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About S. Bitter-Larkin

Sylvie Bitter-Larkin is a private art dealer, specializing in Modern and Contemporary Art. Splitting her time over the last five years between New York and Geneva, she works closely with a diverse clientele of collectors and professionals providing valuable assistance in connoisseurship and expertise in the buying and selling of art in a global market. Ms. Bitter-Larkin’s experience as a former gallery owner and years as a private dealer gives her valuable insight in the upper-end art market and an uncanny eye for young talent.

Sylvie Bitter-Larkin received her MBA in Economics from Paris-Dauphine University and was the founder of the S. Bitter-Larkin Gallery in New York, which specialized in discovering and promoting the careers of new artists such as, among others, Patrick Corillon, Thomas Demand, Roland Flexner, Jim Lutes, Michel Mouffe, Yigal Ozeri, Michal Rovner and Karin Sander. In addition to displaying cutting edge art, the gallery sold major works of modern masters including Alexander Calder, Francis BaconJean-Michel BasquiatJoseph CornellGerhard RichterEd RushaFrank StellaAndy Warhol and Tom Wesselman.

S. Bitter-Larkin has also built and continues to manage her own personal art collection which includes the works of up-and-coming as well as established artists.
June 4, 2015

This exhibition is a selection of young, emerging and established artists, highly accomplished and promising in the international art market. They caught my eye because of their exceptional talent and fresh perspective on this blossoming generation.

Each selected piece holds its own unique vitality through the use of different mediums spanning from photography to sculptural work which, much like this online exhibition, represents a fluid movement from two dimensional to three dimensional.

I have found great inspiration in the works of the artists included below, and there is no greater excitement to me than sharing my aesthetic journey here with you. Over the last few months, I’ve gotten a chance to directly interact with these artists and get a deeper understanding of where their work stems from; highly influenced by their individual place in society, each living and breathing different aspects of life that surrounds us.

Affected by ideas of spatiality and language, these selected artists redefine our understanding of pop culture and shift our understanding of our ever changing society.

Yung Jake

Internet / °2011 / yungjake.tumblr.com
Yung Jake’s sculptural wall works consist of reclaimed scrap metal and images that he either created or found on the internet. Drawing connections between identity and contemporary branding strategies, Yung Jake interweaves current status symbols from both the contemporary art and rap worlds. His most recent exhibitions include Steve Turner, Los Angles; ABC Berlin and Tripoli Gallery, Easthampton. He has performed at SXSW, Austin, MOCA, Redcat, and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. His work has been screened at AFI fest where he won Special Jury Mention, and the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. Yung Jake is represented by Steve Turner, Los Angeles.

Yung Jake’s sculptural wall works consist of reclaimed scrap metal and images that he either created or found on the internet. Drawing connections between identity and contemporary branding strategies, Yung Jake interweaves current status symbols from both the contemporary art and rap worlds. His

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Vinyl wrap on found metal. 36" x 18" x 5" (91.4 x 45.7 x 12.7 cm)

Yung Jake creates conceptual works that consider the nexus between the digital and the real. His sculptural wall works consist of digital images printed on reclaimed metal wherein he reworks and recontextualizes symbols of hip hop and consumer culture.

Alternate view.

Vinyl wrap on found metal. 51.5" x 16.5" x 4" (130.8 x 41.9 x 10.2cm)

Alternate view.

Alternate view.

Michael Assiff

Michael Assiff makes paintings, objects and installations that investigate cultural heritage, environmentalism and branding within the anthropocene. Much of the work takes the form of the hand made; objects which use the materials and aesthetics of commercial production without using its methods (3-D printing, aquaprinting, vacuum forming or injection molding), challenging the nature and authority of the manufactured objects they draw from. In the recent “Chipotle” paintings, liquid plastic is applied by hand, in a manner much similar to cake decorating. The hardened plastic forms a surface relief that prepared canvas is then applied to and contoured with a thermal adhesive system. These so-called “Chipotle” paintings get their moniker for the use of motifs from the interior design and artwork of McDonald’s-funded ‘fast-casual’ Mexican restaurant, Chipotle. They work to investigate the post-colonial legacies of vanquished cultures - in this case that of Meso-American cultures - that has been appropriated and reconfigured to sell fast food. Assiff also works with addictive apps such as FarmVille and Candy Crush. Michael Assiff has had solo exhibitions at Good Weather, North Little Rock, AR and Culture Room, Brooklyn. His work has been included in group exhibitions at Daniele Balice, Paris; Regina Rex Gallery, New York and Martos Gallery, Los Angeles. Forthcoming exhibitions include: Summer Group Show, Salon 94, Bowery, NY; Playlist, Galerie Antoine Ertaskiran, Montreal, QC; The Shared Patio, Greenpoint Terminal, NY; Ashes/Ashes, CA; Michael Assiff, Shoot The Lobster, NY (solo).

Michael Assiff makes paintings, objects and installations that investigate cultural heritage, environmentalism and branding within the anthropocene. Much of the work takes the form of the hand made; objects which use the materials and aesthetics of commercial production without using its methods (3-D printing, aquaprinting, vacuum forming or injection molding), challenging the nature and authority of the manufactured objects they draw from. In the recent “Chipotle” paintings, liquid plastic is applied by hand, in a manner much similar to cake decorating.

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Yamini Nayar

USA / °1975 / yamininayar.com
Yamini Nayar is a photographer who admits to thinking and working more like a sculptor than a photographer. In a 2015 interview with Huffington Post, Nayar said: “I’m interested in the physicality of the photograph – as a visceral object and translator of memory and suppressed narratives.” Nayar reworks raw industrial materials and debris found in her studio chronicling her installations using alternate angles with her camera. Once the work is photographed, the installations are destroyed leaving the photographic image as the sole stand-in for the original work. In representing invented spaces as still images, any sense of scale is concealed from the audience. One can really sense a constant shift of time and motion, a sense of impermanence oscillating between stillness and movement. Nayar has had exhibitions with Thomas Erben Gallery, NY; Amrita Jhaveri Projects, Mumbai; Cincinnati Art Academy; Higher Pictures, NY and Saatchi Museum, London among many others. Nayar’s photography has been acquired by The Guggenheim for their permanent collection as well as by the Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio; Queensland Art Gallery, Australia, and deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, Massachusetts. Yamini Nayar is represented by Thomas Erben Gallery, New York. Yamini Nayar’s work will be included in the forthcoming exhibition: Imagine Reality RAY 2015 Fotografieprojekte at the Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt am Main.

Yamini Nayar is a photographer who admits to thinking and working more like a sculptor than a photographer. In a 2015 interview with Huffington Post, Nayar said: “I’m interested in the physicality of the photograph – as a visceral object and translator of memory and suppressed narratives.”

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Tom Holmes

The simplicity of a stone placed on a grave marker, the weathered grid of a concrete mausoleum, or a gaudily ornamented floral wreath serve as entry points to the formal elements in Holmes’s work. His funerary motif: gravestones, shrouds, arrangements and plots in many cases are analogues for standing sculpture, textile work, panel painting and floor sculpture. Therefore, the subject matter becomes a given for Holmes: a readymade. His obsession, however, is not so much with morbidity – but with finding his own truly American language of abstraction. Holmes has had solo shows at Kunsthalle Bern; Bureau, New York; Galerie Catherine Bastide, Brussels; Au 8 Rue St. Bon, Paris; Dispatch, New York and Exile Berlin. His work has been included in group exhibitions at Freymond-Guth Fine Arts Ltd, Zürich; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; Contemporary Art Biennial, Sélestat; More Young Americans, Paris; Malmö Konstmuseum, Sweden and Whitney Museum of American Art at Altria, New York. Holmes’ work is included in the collections of FRAC Bourgogne, France; Stiftung Kunsthalle, Bern, Germany. Tom Holmes is represented by Bureau, NY. Forthcoming group exhibitions include A New Use of the Self, The Luminary, St. Louis, MO and Borrowed Alibis, Freymond-Guth Fine Arts Ltd, Zürich, Switzerland.

The simplicity of a stone placed on a grave marker, the weathered grid of a concrete mausoleum, or a gaudily ornamented floral wreath serve as entry points to the formal elements in Holmes’s work. His funerary motif: gravestones, shrouds, arrangements and plots in many cases are analogues for standing sculpture, textile work, panel painting and floor sculpture.

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T. Kelly Mason

USA / °1964 / tkellymason.com
T. Kelly Mason's videos, light boxes, sculptures and installations address space and structure as both objects and ideas. Mason's longstanding interest in the ideological coding of space plays off the experiential and direct currents that appear in his art. The subjective experience of the observer is crucial to these works, which reflects the interdependent web of relations between the human, object, and space — without settling upon any definite conclusions. We are left, as Pinakoteck Der Moderne curator Bernhart Schwenk comments, with “our inability to ever comprehend reality and truth comprehensively”, and yet this obvious truth settles upon us lightly, without any of its usual despair. T. Kelly Mason is the recipient of the 2013 Fellows of Contemporary Art fellowship. He had solo exhibitions at CherryandMartin Gallery, Los Angeles; Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Laumeier Sculpture Park, St. Louis, Minnesota; Adamski Gallery, Berlin; Galerie Catherine Bastide, Brussels; Galerie 1900-2000, Paris and more. His work was included in numerous group exhibitions including at the Fonds Regional d’Art Contemporain Bretagne, Rennes, France; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Institute of Contemporary Arts, London; Kunsthalle Dortmund, Germany; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Kunsthalle Basel, and many more. His work is included in the collections of MOCA, Los Angeles; the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and the Centre Pompidou, Paris, among others. T.Kelly Mason is represented by CherryandMartin Gallery, Los Angeles. He is currently included in Prospect 2015, at the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, La Jolla, CA and has a forthcoming solo exhibition at CherryandMartin.

T. Kelly Mason's videos, light boxes, sculptures and installations address space and structure as both objects and ideas. Mason's longstanding interest in the ideological coding of space plays off the experiential and direct currents that appear in his art.

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