American Collectors (Fred and Marcia Weisman)1968 by David Hockney

One of England’s most versatile and inventive artists of the postwar era, David Hockney settled in Los Angeles in 1964. Perhaps the most iconic example from a group of double portraits of friends and associates from the 1960s, this painting depicts the contemporary-art collectors Fred and Marcia Weisman in the sculpture garden of their Los Angeles home. As relentlessly stiff and still as the objects surrounding them, the couple stands apart, his stance echoed in the totem pole to the right, hers in the Henry Moore sculpture behind her. Her toothy smile also mirrors that of the totem pole. Brilliant, raking light flattens and abstracts the scene; this light, rather than any affinity between the collectors, who seem oblivious to each other and their art, unites the composition.
(http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/102234)


While Hockney paints a broad range of subjects, some of his most masterful compositions are his portraits of the late 1960s. These offer unrivaled, almost cinematic, insights into the mood and culture of this transitional decade in American history. Here are Fred and Marcia Weisman, art collectors and friends of Hockney, who appear outside their residence as if stepping outside to greet a neighbor. Hockney's blinding, saturated palette mimics the light of Southern California. The Weismans are surrounded by their prized art possessions, among them an imposing modernist sculpture in a niche, and a totem pole that looks like it could be a third member of the family.

Dry humor pervades all elements of the composition. The viewer half expects to see the vertical elements - the stiff couple and their belongings - blast off like space ships into the blue sky. The threat of the surreal lurking in this picture underscores the consistent relationship between Pop art and older movements. Also noteworthy is the manner in which the poses transgress traditional gender norms. Marcia, a full-figured matron in a robe held closed with one arm, bares her teeth, and strikes a sensual pose that is both gracious and confrontational. Fred, the man of the house, stands stiffly with his fists clenched, and is literally marginalized as he is pushed to the left-hand side.
(http://www.theartstory.org/artist-hockney-david-artworks.htm#pnt_7)
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Imported from: lakeimagesweb.artic.edu