Still Life with Clock by Honoré Sharrer

...Though Sharrer was recognized in a 1951 issue of TIME magazine, the section about her was entitled “Hard-Working Housewife,” implying that, unlike male artists, her work was nothing more than a time-consuming hobby. Fortunately, she was undeterred by sexism and the McCarthy era, creating art that expressed her social conscience, satirical style, and sense of humor.

Experts consider Sharrer a bridge between early surrealism and Pop Art. The Smithsonian Institution even devoted a 2007 exhibition solely to Tribute to the American Working People.

Sharrer said she painted ordinary things. That’s true enough, but in her hands, the ordinary was revered. In noting the everyday and committing it to canvas, Sharrer forces us to look into every face, every parlor, and every workplace and see the humanity there.
[http://www.broadstreetreview.com/wnwnbooks/pafa-presents-subversion-and-surrealism-in-the-art-of-honore-sharrer#]
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