followers
15
"Architecture is a art when one consciously or unconsciously creates aesthetic emotion in the atmosphere and when this environment produces well being." Luis Barragán


"The Art of Seeing. It is essential to an architect to know how to see: I mean, to see in such a way that the vision is not overpowered by rational analysis." - Luis Barragán


One of Mexico's greatest architects, Luis Ramiro Barragán Morfín (March 9, 1902 – Nov. 22, 1988) revolutionized modern architecture in the country with his use of bright colors reminiscent of the traditional architecture of Mexico, and with works such as his Casa Barragán, the Chapel of the Capuchinas, the Torres de Satélite, "Los Clubes" (Cuadra San Cristobal and Fuente de los Amantes), and the Casa Gilardi, among many others.

Barragán was born in Guadalajara, graduating as a civil engineer and architect. Two years later in 1925, he started a two-year journey in Europe, where he was impressed by the beauty of the gardens of the cities he visited and the strong influence of Mediterranean and Muslim culture, and above all of the International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts. It was on this trip that his interest in landscape architecture began.

...In recent years, the discussion around Barragán's work has been rekindled thanks to the bizarre circumstances surrounding his archive. In 1995, the archive was purchased by Rolf Fehlbaum, Chairman of the furniture company Vitra, as an engagement gift for his fiancé Federica Zanco. Since then, the archive has been largely off-limits to researchers as Zanco has attempted to organize and catalog the archive, but many have been angered by the lack of access. The situation came to a head in 2016, when artist Jill Magid presented Zanco with a diamond engagement ring made from the ashes of Luis Barragán himself, in the hope of persuading Zanco to provide researchers more access to her original engagement gift.
[https://www.archdaily.com/607209/spotlight-luis-barragan]
change photo
remove photo

First Collected by

Suzan Hamer

collection
38539

Related Artists

+ add artist