Hall At Shinnecock1892 by William Merritt Chase

The lack of boundary between Chase’s public and private worlds is most evident in his home at Shinnecock. The house had a designated studio, but it also served as a living area where his wife and children could lounge and play.

At times, the entire ground floor of the Shinnecock house became a temporary studio. The large pastel
Hall at Shinnecock captures Alice and two of the daughters in the elaborately decorated great hall. Chase’s own reflection can be seen in the mirrored black armoire.
[http://arthistorynewsreport.blogspot.nl/2016/11/william-merritt-chase.html]



....showing his wife, Alice and Koto, in the rich summer light.

In 1892, Chase, his wife and three daughters found fresh freedom when they moved into their new summer home in Shinnecock, Long Island. Away from the seemingly endless buildings and streets of New York City, just a few steps outside their front door they were surrounded by countryside. Unlike in the city, Chase’s studio was here integrated into the family home, and the children seem to have enjoyed frequent and unlimited access to it.

Many of Chase’s most candid paintings were made here in Shinnecock. (https://eclecticlight.co/2016/09/17/meet-the-family-william-merritt-chase-at-home/)


...Candace Wheeler wrote in her memoirs of Chase's contagious enthusiasm, "the most generous of teachers, not only giving exhaustively of his stored knowledge of how to do things, but fostering as well the will to do it. Later, somewhat against his will, he was persuaded to take charge of an art-school at Shinnecock Hills, Long Island . . . “

At the instigation of Mrs. William Hoyt, Chase opened the Shinnecock Hills Summer School on eastern Long Island, New York in 1891. He taught there until 1902. Chase adopted the plein air method of painting, and often taught his students in outdoor classes. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Merritt_Chase)
Click to select the cover image for this artwork.